March, 2014: Infanrix

A recent report about the 6-valent vaccine Infanrix claims that it is responsible for many deaths. The report claims that 73 infants died since the vaccine was introduced. It also claims that these deaths typically occurred within a few days after the vaccination.

Is this true? Let’s look at the VAERS data. Make a Graph of Year of Vaccination, considering cases where the vaccine Name is infanrix (in Section 3 of the search form), and the patient died (in Section 4). The graph looks like this:

Not only does VAERS data support this report, it goes beyond their conclusions. It shows that there have been 323 deaths associated with Infanrix since its introduction, most of them during the period described in the report. The number of deaths associated with Infanrix reached a peak in the year 2001, when 55 deaths were reported. And keep in mind that VAERS underreporting is well-known, so there could be anywhere between 10 to 100 times more cases than appear here.

So what about the quick onset? Did patients really die within a few days after the vaccination? To find out, make a graph of the Vaccination-to-Death, using the same set of cases (vaccine name is infanrix and the patient died). You will need to check Expert Mode to make this kind of graph. It looks like this:

Once again, the VAERS data agrees with the report’s conclusion. Many patients who die do so within a day.

So what is a concerned parent to do? The good news is that the death rate is dropping significantly. This is either because the vaccine has changed to be less toxic, or fewer people are getting it. Still, my April, 2010 blog entry points out that getting multivalent vaccines or even multiple vaccines at once can have worse outcomes. You might want to consider individual vaccines, or at least those with fewer than six different antigens in them.

Parents should also consider using the Vaccine Ingredients Calculator to find out what adjuvants and preservatives are mixed in with the serum (this site is currently under construction, but keep watching). And as always, talk to your doctor or health-care professionals before making any decision.

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